Toolkit Downloads

All exporter toolkit documents are housed in the relevant toolkit sections, as well as centrally in this section.

US end-market analysis for Kenyan speciality coffee

The United States of America (U.S.) is the largest market for coffee in the world. Within the U.S. coffee sector, the specialty coffee industry imports almost 750 million kilograms (kg) of green, specialty-grade coffee from around the world each year, often paying double the commodity price. Specialty-grade coffees are identified by their high-quality, unique taste characteristics and countries of origin. They are roasted by one of 1,400 U.S. roasters and distributed to hundreds of thousands of coffeehouses, supermarkets, restaurants, and specialty stores. Whether prepared by retailers or sold in bulk packages for self-preparation at home or in the workplace, 35 million Americans drink specialty-grade traditional coffee on a daily basis. As geographic origin plays a major role in the taste and body characteristics of specialty coffee, it can be broadly distinguished by growing region – Latin America, Asia/Pacific or Africa. East Africa currently contributes about 4 percent to the volume of annual U.S. green Arabica imports, the predominant species of specialty-grade coffee. Imports from Kenya alone account for about 6 percent. While Kenya could improve issues related to the price and volume of quality production, the country has historically had a reputation for quality and continues to compare favorably with other countries. In fact, Kenyan AA1 was the first single-origin coffee widely identified by its origin name in the early days of the U.S. specialty coffee...

Author
East Africa Trade and Investment Hub
Organisation
USAID
Publication Date
06 December 2017

Textile processing for apparel manufacturers

Author
Margaret Bishop and Brent Smith
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
09 August 2004
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Tradehub Presentation - World Bank study and lessons learned from exports of afrocentric garments

Author
Charlotte Ashamu and Margaret Bishop
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
23 June 2004
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Presentation on business planning instruction and business plan template

Executive Summary Brief history and ownership structure of the business Markets and competition Marketing and selling methods Products Manufacturing processes Historical Trading or export performance Management and personnel Financial analysis and underlying performance Risks and Rewards

Organisation
USAID / VEGA
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Export readiness assessment

The following "Export Readiness Assessment" is a set of questions designed to assess how prepared your company is to begin exporting to the U.S. The test is designed to identify weak areas in your company's planning so they can be redressed before commencing with the implementation of an export strategy. 

Author
Belisa de las Casas and Luke Zahner
Organisation
George Washington University
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Packaging in West Africa - A resource guide (Tradehub) - ANNEX

The purpose of this directory (Annex to West Africa Packaging Guide) is to help food industry producers identify manufacturers in their country or subregion capable of offering the packaging they need. Its agenda has a sales/marketing goal as opposed to a technical one. This ANNEX 1 contains country information sheets with types of materials listed. We have focused on the most widely used packaging materials, namely plastic and cardboard. The information sheets are structured as follows: Section 1: Type of material Section 2: Company address Section 3: Options offered by the company for the material concerned Section 4: Basic information for commercial

Author
Naji Choueri and Micah Frumkin
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
15 May 2007
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Packaging in West Africa - A resource guide (Tradehub)

Most small and medium-sized African businesses have difficulty sourcing affordable quality packaging for their products. Few packaging suppliers exist within the region and even fewer have the ability to create packaging that meets international standards and satisfies consumer preferences. Many African producers therefore turn to Europe and North America for packaging supplies, which significantly increases operating costs. In spite of the lack of quality packaging supplies in West Africa compared to Europe and North America, some sources do exist within the region; it is simply a matter of identifying them. It is in this context that the West Africa Trade Hub developed this resource guide for packaging in West Africa. The guide’s main objective is to offer practical suggestions on packaging and help food industry operators access information about packaging that will support the growth of their businesses. A case study is included that applies these suggestions and demonstrates the utility of this guide. The guide begins with an overview of the demand for packaging in West Africa and reviews different types of packaging, examining their relative advantages and disadvantages. The guide highlights the importance of good packaging, which can significantly influence sales of the finished product. High quality packaging is defined not only by its visual appearance, but also by the choice of words and graphics on labels as well as its compliance with local and...

Author
Naji Choueiri and Micah Frumkin
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
14 December 2007
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Guidelines to successful tradeshow participation

Author
WA Tradehub
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
13 January 2006
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The global apparel value chain: What prospects for upgrading by developing countries

Author
UNIDO
Organisation
UNIDO
Publication Date
17 July 2003
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Raw materials traceability for US apparel imports - 2005

Raw materials traceability is the ability to identify, through a comprehensive system of lot numbers and documentation, the source of each and every fabric and trim used to produce a given garment. 

Author
Margaret Bishop
Organisation
Consultant, WA Tradehub
Publication Date
24 November 2005

Meeting expectations relative to apparel product standards and specifications

Author
Gwendolyn S. O'Neal
Organisation
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
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Apparel export guide - WA Tradehub 2006

Author
West Africa Tradehub
Organisation
West Africa Tradehub
Publication Date
30 June 2006
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Irradiation quarantine - Export development feasibility Study Tradehub 2005

Author
Michelle Marcotte, Abt Associates et al
Organisation
WA Tradehub
Publication Date
15 October 2005
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APHIS Factsheet on importing food and agricultural products into the United States

Author
APHIS
Organisation
Department of Agriculture
Publication Date
15 August 2012
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APHIS Commodity import approval process for agricultural products into the US

To obtain access to U.S. markets for a fruit, vegetable, plant, or plant product that is not already an approved commodity, one must initiate a commodity import request. There are 4 steps in the process: Determine if the commodity is an approved commodity or currently undergoing a pest risk analysis If it is not approved or currently undergoing a pest risk analysis, submit a commodity import request APHIS will conduct a pest risk analysis and an environmental review to determine potential pests likely to remain on the commodity upon importation and potential mitigations that may be required to avoid, reduce, or eliminate the risk of pest introduction. If APHIS determines that the commodity can be safely imported into the United States, APHIS will initiate the regulatory administrative process to seek public comment

Author
APHIS
Organisation
Department of Agriculture
Publication Date
08 February 2013
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APHIS Permitted fruit and vegetables into the US - APHIS Guide 2012

The Fruits and Vegetables Import Manual provides the import requirements for regulating imported articles of fresh, usable parts of plants such as fruits, stems, leaves, roots, and flowers (herbs and vegetables). These imported articles are not intended for planting or growing, but they might serve to introduce exotic pests. 

Author
APHIS
Organisation
US Department of Agriculture
Publication Date
01 October 2012
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Questions and Answers: Importing irradiated fruit into the United States

Factsheet produced in 2008 by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, on importing irradiated fruit into the United States

Author
APHIS
Organisation
Department of Agriculture
Publication Date
17 July 2008
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Category 9 Determinations on eligibility for textile exports under AGOA - all countries

Schedule of determinations, for each applicable AGOA beneficiary, relating to Category 9 articles under AGOA: Traditional and folklore textiles

Author
OTEXA
Organisation
OTEXA
Publication Date
02 April 2010
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Cashew value chain analysis: Ghana

Author
African Cashew Initiative
Organisation
African Cashew Initiative
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African cashews and the African Cashew Initiative (ACI)

Author
The African Cashew Alliance
Organisation
The African Cashew Alliance
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Cashew Production: Factory location and layout planning

Author
Christian Dahm
Organisation
African Cashew Alliance / WA Trade Hub
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Exporter readiness questionnaire

Author
West Africa Tradehub
Organisation
West Africa Tradehub
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Establishing cashew-processing in West Africa

Author
Mim Cashew and Agricultural Products Ltd
Organisation
Mim Cashew and Agricultural Products Ltd
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Category 9 Textiles - US Customs and Border Protection slides on applicable preferences - 2003

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) slides on Folklore and Category 9 benefits  

Author
US Customs and Border Agency
Organisation
US Customs and Border Agency
Publication Date
04 August 2003
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GSP Handbook (UNCTAD) 2003

Handbook / Guide on the General System of Preferences (GSP) of the United States. This guide includes features of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) as it relates to the GSP. Prepared by the UNCTAD Technical Cooperation Project on Market Access, Trade Laws and Preferences.

Author
UNCTAD
Organisation
United Nations
Publication Date
13 May 2003
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Category 9 Textiles - Guide for eligible governments to the application for traditional fabrics to be included under AGOA

Instructions for beneficiary country governments to apply for approval of handloomed / handmade / folklore articles under Category 9

Author
US Office for Textiles and Apparel (OTEXA)
Organisation
US Office for Textiles and Apparel (OTEXA)
Publication Date
01 May 2003
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Lists and codes of US ports (a customs requirement)

Classification of United States customs districts and ports for US foreign trade. This appendix provides a complete listing of valid district/port codes of the U.S., and is important information for exporters and shipping agencies.

Author
U.S. Customs
Organisation
U.S. Customs
Publication Date
27 October 2000
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Review of AGOA certificate of origin - request for comments 2013

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is extending through August 14, 2013 the period for public comment on the proposed extension of the African Growth and Opportunity Act Certificate of Origin. For preferential treatment under AGOA, the exporter is required to prepare a certificate of origin and provide it to the importer. This certificate includes information such as contact information for the importer, exporter and producer; the basis for which preferential treatment is claimed; and a description of the imported merchandise. Importers are required to have the certificate in their possession at the time of the claim and to provide it to CBP upon request.

Author
Department of Homeland Security
Organisation
Department of Homeland Security
Publication Date
10 July 2013
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AGOA Countries: Challenges and considerations in exporting horticultural products to the United States

Congress, the Administration, and other stakeholders continue to be involved in serious efforts to improve upon the African Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA), which was first signed into law a decade ago, on May 18, 2000. To meet its objective of enhancing U.S. market access for subSaharan African countries that are pursuing market reforms measures, the AGOA preferential trade legislation was designed to encourage and support countries in this region ―that are taking often difficult but critical steps necessary to create more open, market and growth-oriented economies.‖1 AGOA eligibility currently extends to 38 African countries, with some benefitting from exports of natural resources such as oil and minerals, while others have been able to develop textile and apparel industries in which goods are more easily manufactured and exported without barriers to market in the United States. Nigeria and Angola are leading oil producers and suppliers to the U.S.; these two countries alone accounted for 80 percent of all AGOA imports in 2008. In contrast, the value of agricultural exports to the United States from 14 other AGOA-eligible countries was less than $1 million in 2009. In fact, three of these countries – Namibia, Seychelles, and Chad had less than $100,000 in agricultural exports under AGOA in 2009 (see Annex A).

Author
Richard Pasco
Organisation
McLeod, Watkinson & Miller
Publication Date
31 July 2010