Toolkit Downloads

All exporter toolkit documents are housed in the relevant toolkit sections, as well as centrally in this section.

Ethiopia coffee industry value chain analysis (USAID / COMPETE 2010)

Profiling the actors, their interactions, costs, constraints and opportunities. The birthplace of coffee, Ethiopia is home to some of the finest coffees in the world. Ethiopia is currently the top African coffee exporter and ranked sixth in the global market. Ethiopia exported 170,888 tons of coffee and earned $525.2 million during June/July 2007/08 period compared with 176,390 tons worth $424.2 million in 2006/07. Coffee generates 70 percent of Ethiopia‘s foreign exchange earnings and provides livelihoods for 15 million Ethiopian smallholder farmers. The coffee economy employs several hundred thousand workers in processing either red cherry (key eshet) or dried pulp coffee (jenfel) in hundreds of washing stations and hulling mills around the country. Government institutions are responsible for the state coffee plantations with approximately 8000 permanent employees and an estimated 50,000 casual jobs annually. Coffee generates a considerable number of jobs on-farm, in the processing plants and in the transport sector. In Ethiopia, coffee constitutes a very important source of casual employment for many poor people and most agro-processing employees are women. 

Author
Chemonics International Inc
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Burundi coffee supply value chain analysis (USAID / COMPETE 2010)

Profiling the actors, their interaction, costs constraints and opportunities. The coffee industry is the country's main export, providing about 70% of foreign currency revenues. Roughly 600,000 rural households, or almost 40% of the population, grow coffee and coffee represents an important source of income in the family economy. The Burundian farmer’s interest in growing coffee is based on the fact that coffee is a seasonal product that provides a chunk of income larger than what the farmer is able to save during the course of the year. According to the latest statistics available, income from coffee growing provides 50% of family income in the northern region of Buyenzi1. This revenue allows the farmer to finance house construction and send children to school, as well as other small investments. In addition, with the initiation of micro-credit schemes in rural areas, ownership of coffee trees is the main guarantee that farmers can offer micro-credit institutions (COOPEC2 and others). It worth noting that the construction of de-pulping stations in rural areas led to the (modest) beginnings of industrialization, employment for local labor during the coffee campaign and the opening up of rural areas through the construction of factory access roads which are also used for other purposes. 

Author
Chemonics International Inc.
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Building SPS capacity for increased international trade - Tradehub

Author
Kofi HUMADO
Organisation
West Africa Tradehub
Publication Date
01 March 2007
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What every member of the international trade community should know about recordkeeping

Author
US Dept Homeland Security
Organisation
US Dept Homeland Security
Publication Date
21 January 2016

The global textile and clothing industry post the agreement on textiles and clothing

Author
Hildegunn Kyvik Nordås
Organisation
WTO
Publication Date
16 August 2004
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What every member of the trade community should know about: Commercial samples

Guide to the importation into the United States of commercial samples

Author
US Customs and Border Protection Agency
Organisation
CBP
Publication Date
01 April 2003